Know Our Universe

itsfullofstars:

A couple of days ago, Britney Spears tweeted at Curiosity — NASA’s radioisotope-powered Martian space rover — “So @MarsCuriosity… does Mars look the same as it did in 2000?” She then linked to her video for “Oops!… I Did It Again,” which takes place on, of course, Mars. The $2.5 billion…

n-a-s-a:

Curiosity on Mars: Still Life with Rover 
Image Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech 

n-a-s-a:

Curiosity on Mars: Still Life with Rover

Image Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech 

A Flare To Reckon: Solar Flare Spewing Out

On July 12th, the Sun spewed out an X1.4 class solar-flare that erupted from the center of the sun. This filter image shows the active region 1520 from where the solar flare erupted. The Sun was quite “active” past month.

We’ve seen solar flares of X17 and X20 years before. 

This July, a flare of X1.1 class spewed out first from the Active Region 1515. Another flare, the one you see in the picture, happened in the same week, and reached the earth on July 15th. That was recorded as being an X1.4 class.

Image Source: Flickr

A Skyrocket in Space: Newborn Star’s Dance Across Cosmos

Quite naturally, this is one of the best images of Space we can ever feast our eyes on. What looks like a skyrocket dancing its way across space is actually a newborn star that’s dangling its way across a highly dense cloud of molecular hydrogen. The gas stream or the plumes of smoke are actually very thin – billions of times less denser than an actual plume from a skyrocket.

The plumes are themselves spaced out by several light years across. It’s not something that happened in a few seconds, actually. It’s spread over several light years so it’s a magnificently huge sector that the Hubble is seeing.

Interestingly, scientists can retrace the movements of the newborn star through calculations of the boundary conditions in the plumes and the hot gas and trace back to a position where studies in mass accretion can be done for the newborn star. 

I can’t imagine our Sun having actually having dashed and dangled across space like this before becoming a responsible star at the center of our system. But it’s more or less like the youthful exuberance which later becomes a mature stability.

Image Source: Flickr